We're still alive

We are currently working on the upcoming releases on Pesto. A LOAD of new Pesto singles, Pesto EPs and compilations are coming your way in brief! So long, please also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Soundcloud and YouTube.

Speak soon...J

Why we don't put out one or two releases each month

So, there you look at the Pesto discography. 15 singles to date, a couple of compilations with exclusive tracks and two EPs. What's your guess on how old that label is? One year or a bit more? Wrong! Pesto Music as an idea came to birth in 2001, the first release on vinyl was in 2003. "Eight years in operation and all you came up with is this meager number of releases?" you may ask. And while we agree that indeed it's not a lot of releases, we would like to direct your focus away from the sheer number of output to the quality of our releases.

There are other labels, especially those without well known names in their artist roster that put out a single each and every week. The majority of their releases being plain crap, there are still some nice ones - the pearls - among them. These labels follow a lead that can be best described as follows: many releases lead to more visibilty and acknowledgement in the scene, the few superb records we have will skyrocket. That's one possible way of seeing things and it's proven to work. I don't have a problem with that attitude at all as I see it's a way of promoting a label in a cost-effective manner. You can still focus on quality later and decrease your release rate. Just by being present, these labels gain attention - nothing wrong with that.

So what are we doing here at Pesto Music? We focus on a specific quality. You probably won't see Pesto releases in the sales charts of download services too often (well, they are in fact) and they're never the next over-hyped thing. Pesto releases have long-standing qualities which excludes releasing hits that you're tired to listen in six months. Whenever I send the Pesto Music catalogue to somebody who's not familiar with it, they are always surprised by the release date and tell me that our stuff doesn't sound dusted at all.

In addition, a lot of focus goes into the track list. Looking at our Pesto EPs, you will find six tracks by various artists there. And even if we have 20 signed tracks, ready to be released, that doesn't automatically mean we have the next three EPs. Lots of dedication is put into compiling those EPs. Are these two tracks too similar vibe wise? Is this one a bit too far off sound wise? Isn't that one too hard for the rest of that playlist? Could it be that this one is better put on the next 2.0 or toolbox compilation rather than on this EP? Lots of things that have to be considered in order to create a lovely package for you. That also means listening to possible track listings 20, 30, sometimes even 50 times.

"Is all this effort worth it" you ask? Well, from an economic standpoint, it surely isn't. We'd be way better off if we released more and maybe sign weaker tracks.

But in the end, it's that philosophy that we stick to. We want Pesto Music to be a label known for its distinctive style, for its musical quality and for the love we put in every "product". In the far future, when we intend to retire, we want to listen to our catalogue, nodding our heads to every groove, feel the bass of any track, have memories stirred up connected with those tunes, pay attention to the lyrics, sip on our drink, lean back with a big smile on our face and say "Yeah, that's definitely the way WE wanted to it!"

Guest post: Anne Clark

Here's the second post in a loose series of articles by guest writers. If you missed the highly anticipated first one, please see here.
Today, we have the great pleasure and feel truly honoured to present you a piece by the queen of our darkness, a true 1980ies icon whose status lasts to this very day, a woman that shaped my big brother's music taste as well as mine, a lovely human being I had the chance to meet and chat with after a great concert here in Cologne - ladies and gentlemen, please make some noise for the one and only
Anne Clark!

Sitting here on a bright and chilly November morning. A big steaming mug of tea and the dawn of a new day and a new project for me.

Music has always been a passion for me. All kinds of music. All ways. Always.

Language and words too. An (astrological, so I am told!) need to communicate!

The two are inextricably linked for me.

Words and music.

Music is the vessel that can carry us, all of us, any of us, to a higher plain.

Words can kill or cure us. Sometimes just one word is enough.

It’s that simple.

I have dabbled with every kind of music over the past 30 or so years. Well, my whole life in fact. The endless possibilities. A treasure box full of jewels, a child in a candy store!

I love the rough, raw scratchiness of a solo cello or violin. The butterflies-in-the-stomach swell of massed strings. The soaring purity of an oboe note. The primal, ancient earthiness of a drum beat. The beauty of a piano or guitar melody. All the human expression of love and joy and pain in the single voice of a singer. The challenge of a jazz ensemble! The madness of sampling old-style years ago with a cassette player somehow hooked up to the TV or radio. A microphone hand-held in the air as a thousand migrating geese fly in formation overhead…I love and lose myself in it all.

And…..the endless possibilities of “electronic” music.

Don’t ask me if it’s Techno, Electro, Industrial, Minimal, Maximal, Deep, Light, House, Garage or Lounge, EBM, IDM, Rap or Hip-Hop…

All I want to know is, does it make me feel. Does it make me feel something I have never felt before?

Since I was a child I have often wondered what it would be like to see a totally new colour. And I mean new. I don’t mean a different shade of blue or red or yellow or silver or black. I mean a colour that has never been seen before. It drives me almost crazy just to think about it!

I assume however that it is not and never will be a possibility…..something to do with spectrums and light waves and limitations of the human eye.

Yet, although our hearing has frequency limitations, it seems that from what is basically just a handful of notes, we can endlessly create new sounds, new music.

It is truly amazing when you really think about it!

And for me, the genre known as “electronic” music is that treasure trove full of jewels, the candy store full of colours, textures, tastes and flavours.

The possibilities with sound, unlike colour it seems, are endless……

Anne Clark, November 2010

this is the cover artwork for Anne Clark's


PAST & FUTURE TENSE – Chapter One, a reinterpreted retrospective of the music and words of Anne Clark is released on After Hours Productions through Believe Digital on 10th November 2010. We'll follow up on that one in short.